Sugary Beverages

Sugary Beverages and Obesity

Sugary Beverages

Sugary Beverages

The list of reasons to avoid sugary beverages is getting longer. Americans get more of their daily calories from sugar, mainly in the form of high fructose corn syrup found in soda and other sugary beverages. Many people believe that as long as you drink fruit juice, then it is healthy even if it’s sweet. This is a dangerous misconception and adds to the rising rates of weight gain, obesity, fatty liver disease, high blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes. Sugary beverages, such as soda and fruit juice, contain fructose which is one of the primary culprits involved in the rise of obesity and related health problems because of it’s ability to turn on your “fat switch.” Research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism 2013 Scientific Sessions propose sugary beverages are to blame for about 183,000 deaths worldwide each year, including 133,000 diabetes deaths, 44,000 heart disease deaths, and 6,000 cancer deaths. The United States was ranked 3rd in the world with an estimated 25,000 annual deaths from sugary beverages. Interestingly enough the death rates connected with sweetened beverages were highest in those under the age of 45. In 2009 the American Heart Association issued a scientific statement about sugar intake and heart health showing that there is evidence for an association between the two stating: “High intakes of dietary sugars in the setting of a worldwide pandemic of obesity and cardiovascular disease have heightened concerns about the adverse effects of excessive consumption of sugars.

Sugary Beverages Limits

A prudent upper limit of intake is half of the discretionary calorie allowance, which for most women is no more than 100 calories per day and for most men is no more than 150 calories per day from added sugars.” Think about this, one 12 ounce regular soda contains about 140 calories which is the equivalent of 10 teaspoons of sugar. Similarly, one 8 ounce glass of orange juice has about 8 teaspoons of sugar and at least 50% of that sugar is fructose. Even the designer waters may have Sucralose or Splenda as an artificial sweetener and like aspartame, may reduce the amount of good bacteria in your intestinal tract by 50% or increase your pH levels. The report makes it clear that Splenda can pose a threat to those who consume the product. People who consume sugary beverages regularly—1 to 2 cans a day or
more—have a 26% greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than people who rarely have such drinks. Your best choice is to drink filtered tap water. But, it means that it has to be filtered to avoid the dangers of fluoride, toxic disinfection byproducts and heavy metals.

This article on Sugary Beverages is informational and not to be used to diagnose or treat any medical condition

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